"Science class should not end in tragedy."

"Science class should not end in tragedy."

"The snake reportedly fought the croc for five hours in Lake Moondarra. Winning the fight, the python constricted its prey to death. The estimated 10-foot snake then dragged the 3-foot croc ashore and proceeded to swallow it whole in front of a group of onlookers."

Whole story here.

!!! awesome

Sunset on Mars
On May 19, 2005, NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Spirit captured this stunning view as the Sun sank below the rim of Gusev crater on Mars.

Sunset on Mars

On May 19, 2005, NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Spirit captured this stunning view as the Sun sank below the rim of Gusev crater on Mars.

hanging out here for the week.  
hopefully we find some fossils and relief from the heat.

hanging out here for the week.  

hopefully we find some fossils and relief from the heat.

athankyou:

Ancient reptile birth preserved in fossil: Ichthyosaur fossil may show oldest live reptilian birth. 
Scientists report a new fossil specimen that belongs to Chaohusaurus (Reptilia, Ichthyopterygia), the oldest of Mesozoic marine reptiles that lived approximately 248 million years ago. The partial skeleton was recovered in China and may show a live birth. The maternal skeleton was associated with three embryos and neonates: one inside the mother, another exiting the pelvis-with half the body still inside the mother-and the third outside of the mother.

kewl.

athankyou:

Ancient reptile birth preserved in fossil: Ichthyosaur fossil may show oldest live reptilian birth. 

Scientists report a new fossil specimen that belongs to Chaohusaurus (Reptilia, Ichthyopterygia), the oldest of Mesozoic marine reptiles that lived approximately 248 million years ago. The partial skeleton was recovered in China and may show a live birth. The maternal skeleton was associated with three embryos and neonates: one inside the mother, another exiting the pelvis-with half the body still inside the mother-and the third outside of the mother.

kewl.

Huge trove of dinosaur footprints discovered in Alaska

A “world-class” dinosaur track site discovered in Alaska’s Denali National Park shows that herds of duck-billed dinosaurs thrived under the midnight sun.

"We had mom, dad, big brother, big sister and little babies all running around together," said paleontologist Anthony Fiorillo, who is studying the dinosaur tracks. “As I like to tell the park, Denali was a family destination for millions of years, and now we’ve got the fossil evidence for it.”

The discovery adds to Fiorillo’s growing conviction that dinosaurs lived at polar latitudes year-round during the Late Cretaceous Period, about 70 million years ago.

"Even back then the high latitudes were biologically productive and could support big herds of pretty big animals," said Fiorillo, curator of earth sciences at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas.

Full article from CBS News here

New Insights About Evolving Triceratops 

In the latest paper to be published about findings from the Hell Creek Formation, Montana State University doctoral candidate John Scannella and three co-authors reveal new insights into the evolution of Triceratops, based on more than 50 specimens that have been collected in recent years.

Over one to two million years at the end of the Cretaceous Period, Triceratops went from having a small nasal horn and long beak to having a long nasal horn and shorter beak. The dinosaur with a small nasal horn and long beak is a Triceratops horridus. It was only found lower in the Hell Creek Formation. The dinosaur with a long nasal horn and shorter beak is a Triceratops prorsus. It was only found near the top of the Hell Creek Formation.  Skulls found in the middle of the Hell Creek Formation showed characteristics of both Triceratops horridus and Triceratops prorsus.

“This study provides a detailed look at shifts in the morphology of a single dinosaur genus over time,” Scannella said.

blue was an interesting choice.

Newly Discovered Mouse-like Mammal is Closely Related to Elephants
A new mammal discovered in the remote desert of western Africa resembles a long-nosed mouse in appearance but is more closely related genetically to elephants, a California scientist who helped identify the tiny creature said on Thursday.
The new species of elephant shrew, given the scientific name Macroscelides micus, inhabits an ancient volcanic formation in Namibia and sports red fur that helps it blend in with the color of its rocky surroundings, said John Dumbacher, one of a team of biologists behind the discovery.
Genetic testing of the creature – which weighs up to an ounce (28 grams) and measures 7.5 inches (19 cm) in length, including its tail – revealed its DNA to be more akin to much larger mammals.

Newly Discovered Mouse-like Mammal is Closely Related to Elephants

A new mammal discovered in the remote desert of western Africa resembles a long-nosed mouse in appearance but is more closely related genetically to elephants, a California scientist who helped identify the tiny creature said on Thursday.

The new species of elephant shrew, given the scientific name Macroscelides micus, inhabits an ancient volcanic formation in Namibia and sports red fur that helps it blend in with the color of its rocky surroundings, said John Dumbacher, one of a team of biologists behind the discovery.

Genetic testing of the creature – which weighs up to an ounce (28 grams) and measures 7.5 inches (19 cm) in length, including its tail – revealed its DNA to be more akin to much larger mammals.

Scientific name: Theraphosa blondi

Common Names:

  • Giant bird-eater spider,
  • Giant bird-eating tarantula,
  • Giant tarantula,
  • Goliath Birdeater

Goliath bird-eating spiders are tarantulas of epic proportions. Biggest by mass and coming very close to the giant huntsman for the title of largest spider in the world. As their name suggests, Goliath bird-eaters are certainly big enough to eat a bird, although they rarely do, preferring smaller insects and invertebrates. Interestingly, it was a Victorian explorer who first reported these giant spiders and witnessed one eating a hummingbird.

Like most tarantulas, Goliath bird-eaters are fairly harmless to humans. They only attack when threatened and their bite is no worse than the sting of a wasp. They live in deep burrows in the rainforests of northern South America.

Info from BBC- Nature


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